SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN WITH ALESSIA TU OF LAMPOON

Just days before our much anticipated event* in Ruse on sustainable practices and the role of design in reframing the narrative of the environmental crisis, we present our guests in a series of interviews.

Alessia Tu is the content editor of Milan based Lampoon Magazine. She is a translator and journalist specializing in the intersection between fashion, design and architecture with a focus on sustainability.

Lampoon Magazine is a fashion, art and culture magazine based in Milan and published in English focused on sustainability and human commitment looking to feature brands and companies within industries that are making a difference, with the aim to provide them with a unique platform.

Why Lampoon as the name of a magazine tackling issues of sustainability?

AT: In 2015, at a critical time for the publishing industry, came Lampoon. A new and independent fashion magazine named after the satirical American magazine from Harvard University, famous in the 1970s. Lampoon, which means ‘Ironic Newspaper’ in English, was born with the idea to propose a fashion that was accessible to everyone, through its informative pages, and interaction between images, text, form and content.

Over the years the magazine has evolved through an effort of great research and care in both editorial and visual areas. The main focus of the magazine now is sustainability, which is interpreted by delving into every asset of the circular economy in all sectors: fashion, art, design and architecture.

The main strengths of Lampoon’s journalistic narrative are the global reporting of the strongest commitments to sustainable development and the dialogues and cultural connections between industry leaders and emerging voices and talents. Ample space is devoted to craftsmanship, with the aim of preserving Italian roots and heritage.

Where do you find your stories? Are these signs of a positive change? And are they enough to be optimistic about the future?

AT: We are very curious. We read a lot of newspaper, magazine both printed and online, we watch documentaries, movies, listen to podcasts. Whenever we can we go to places and try to see realities in person. This way we always find ideas for new stories

All true and honest businesses that are doing something to make a positive change are always a good thing to take as examples to follow. Nothing is never enough thinking about the future ahead of us but still doing something instead of nothing is a step forward.

 

If there is one thing each one of us should start doing right now in order to save the planet, what would it be?

AT: Instead of just one I would personally say three things: stop buying things we don’t really need, sell and buy second hand, try to eat more plant based

One misconception about the term sustainability?

AT: A part from the fact that today the word sustainability has been overused, and most of the time it’s all about marketing and greenwashing, there are few misconceptions about the term sustainability. One would be that when you think about the word sustainability you could think about expensive.

For example, if you think about fashion, you might think that to be truly sustainable you would have to stop buying fast fashion and instead buy only expensive clothing that would be synonymous with quality. This is not true. That is why I said that one of the best things to do is to buy second-hand products, where you can find extraordinary quality, in good condition and at a lower price than a new product with a mark-up.

Your favourite book/movie on the subject you would recommend?

AT: I would recommend to read Rachel Carson’s book Silent Spring published in 1962 (This year marks its sixtieth anniversary).

Alessia Tu is presenting her editorial work and is part of the discussion in Ruse on 28.05.2022 / Saturday, 18:00 at Canetti House. The entrance is free.

 

 

*Sustainable Practices in Design and Fashion is a series of discussions and presentations in five Bulgarian cities – Ruse, Burgas, Gabrovo, Varna and Plovdiv. The project is initiated by Liszt Institute – Hungarian Cultural Institute in Sofia and is curated by Studio Komplekt, who are also leading the discussions. The event introduces the general public to a variety of practices that formulate an important change in the industry towards greener production and consumption. Combining science, design, technology and media, they offer new, closer to nature models for the use of raw materials. Each of the selected Bulgarian cities is hosting a discussion on sustainability with two guest speakers from Europe, as well as a traveling exhibition with 24 examples of sustainable fashion and design brands from the Visegrad Group.

SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN WITH KATARÍNA HUTYROVÁ OF NOSENE

Just days before our much anticipated event* in Ruse on sustainable practices and the role of design in reframing the narrative on the imminence of taking actions for saving the planet now, we present our two special guests in consecutive interviews.

Katarína Hutyrová is the founder, co-owner and manager of NOSENE. She was included in the “30 under 30” list by Forbes Slovakia (2019) and won two times the Via Bona Award with NOSENE (Good Community Partner Award in 2016, Green Company Award in 2018). She is an avid enthusiast and ambassador for sustainable fashion and lifestyle through her activities as an author and moderator of the podcast “The New Sustainable Age”

NOSENE offers a wide range of sustainable options for the consumer: worn or upcycled clothes, natural and local cosmetics, ecological handbags or sneakers, beautiful recycled jewelry, books, recycled stockings and nylons and household cleaners. “Our production is not only local, but as close to being zero waste as is achievable, and we recycle most of our waste and up-cycle where possible.”

What does NOSENE mean and what was your concept when labelling your brand with it?

Katarína Hutyrová: NOSENE means “worn” in English. It is the new generation of second hand, it’s “shop that makes you feel good and sells clothes that smell wonderful”. The decision to buy an already used piece of clothing is a step towards supporting fashion sustainability. Fast fashion causes the clothing industry to produce waste, which often ends up on a junkyard, where it takes decades to decompose. In most cases, those are clothes that were worn only a couple of times, sometimes not even once.

In what way is your second hand brand different from the rest? What is unique about it and how do you nurture it?

KH: We change the way you feel in the second hand and how it looks. We select right pieces, have own upcyled collection RENEWALS BY NOSENE and bring choices how you can change your behaviour in sustainable livestyle

Why is secondhand consumption better as a lifestyle choice? What needs to be done in order to keep it in the loop of contemporary fashion developments?

KH: Every day millions of people buy clothes without any thought or remorse for the consequences of those purchases. Shopping is becoming “Americans’ favourite pastime.” Because it is one of the biggest environmental problems. More specific – second or third dirtiest industry in the world.

 

If there is one thing each one of us should start doing right now in order to save the planet, what would it be?

KH: Stop buying new clothes. Instead choose an already used piece or a local brand, take your own bottle, your own cup, buy less food or take a walk instead of traveling by car.

One misconception about the term sustainability?

KH: That I cannot change anything as an individual.

Your favourite book/movie on the subject you would recommend?

KH: David Attenborough – A life on our planet.

*Sustainable Practices in Design and Fashion is a series of discussions and presentations in five Bulgarian cities – Ruse, Burgas, Gabrovo, Varna and Plovdiv. The project is initiated by Liszt Institute – Hungarian Cultural Institute in Sofia and is curated by Studio Komplekt, who are also leading the discussions. The event introduces the general public to a variety of practices that formulate an important change in the industry towards greener production and consumption. Combining science, design, technology and media, they offer new, closer to nature models for the use of raw materials. Each of the selected Bulgarian cities is hosting a discussion on sustainability with two guest speakers from Europe, as well as a traveling exhibition with 24 examples of sustainable fashion and design brands from the Visegrad Group.